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tv   Politics Live  BBC News  January 10, 2024 11:15am-1:01pm GMT

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on shipping lanes there. according to a statement from the ministry of defence. .. "overnight, hms diamond, along with us warships, successfully repelled the largest attack from the iranian—backed houthis in the red sea to date." hms diamond used sea viper missiles and guns, and destroyed multiple attack drones heading for her, and commercial shipping in the area. there were no injuries or damage sustained by hms diamond or her crew. the ministry of defence has issued these images of the live firing undertaken by the crew of hms diamond. it's understood that more than 20 missiles and drones were shot down. at this stage the ministry of defence has not said if there were any casualties among the houthi attackers. the precise location of the incident is not known, but it happened somewhere in the red sea — the body of water which separates the arabian peninsula from north eastern africa. we arejoined live now byjoshua hutchinson, managing director of intelligence & risk for the ambrey global maritime risk management firm. welcome to you joshua, good to have you on the programme. this has been going on, the attacks by the houthi
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rebels have been going on since the october the 7th hamas attacks. what is your assessment for shipping in the area, how serious is it? last niuht the area, how serious is it? last night was _ the area, how serious is it? last night was the — the area, how serious is it? last night was the largest _ the area, how serious is it? test night was the largest escalation to date since the 19th of november. there has been a report of 18 drone and missile attacks that were launched in a multilayered attack last night from the north. we have not seen this escalation to date. there are a number of assumptions of why it took place last night. the houthi are still very clear that they will continue to target israeli affiliated vessels.— affiliated vessels. more than 20 countries signed _ affiliated vessels. more than 20 countries signed a _ affiliated vessels. more than 20 countries signed a us _ affiliated vessels. more than 20 countries signed a us led - affiliated vessels. more than 20 i countries signed a us led coalition a few weeks ago to try to come out with a statement to say that it
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won't be tolerated. it doesn't look like it is making any difference, does it? , ., like it is making any difference, does it? , . ., , , does it? the statement was very clear against _ does it? the statement was very clear against the _ does it? the statement was very clear against the coalition. - does it? the statement was very clear against the coalition. the l clear against the coalition. the statement was that if the coalition escalated to land, for example the us or other states targeting pc on land, then they would target the coalition. the threat has not changed to commercial shipping it is still a— risk. other vessels might be targeted. five or 600 vessels are operating in this area. we are listening to communications and linking with coalition forces is making the difference between private and military organisations for the commercial sector. what private and military organisations for the commercial sector. what is the tar: et for the commercial sector. what is the target here — for the commercial sector. what is the target here because _ for the commercial sector. what is the target here because the - for the commercial sector. what is| the target here because the houthi said they are going to target ships
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linked to israel. but some people say that ships targeted have no links to israel.— say that ships targeted have no links to israel. their statement is still we will _ links to israel. their statement is still we will target _ links to israel. their statement is still we will target israeli - still we will target israeli vessels. we would look to develop between israel and the palestinians. no one in the commercial sector wants to see that escalation on land because the threats are clear. when we saw these attacks last night, it is the largest collective attack across an area. there are several hundreds of miles between these attacks are taking place. we feel that could have been a test of the coalition. there were very few israeli vessels operating in the area at the time, therefore we would question why such an attack. what we have seen is a clear statement from coalition forces that they will not tolerate this. they will defend commercial shipping and successfully. your statement from
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hms diamond saying they did not receive casualties. i can say on behalf a commercial shipping there were no casualties. the task force is working and is effective but we do need to continue to de—escalate the situation in the red sea, not escalated. ., . ., ., , escalated. how much of an impact is this havin: escalated. how much of an impact is this having on _ escalated. how much of an impact is this having on shipping _ escalated. how much of an impact is this having on shipping in _ escalated. how much of an impact is this having on shipping in the - escalated. how much of an impact is this having on shipping in the red i this having on shipping in the red sea? how many ships are diverging elsewhere? fist sea? how many ships are diverging elsewhere? �* ., ., elsewhere? at the moment we have seen about one _ elsewhere? at the moment we have seen about one in _ elsewhere? at the moment we have seen about one in five _ elsewhere? at the moment we have seen about one in five vessels - seen about one in five vessels going around the cape of good hope. as the situations take place, we will see more shipping companies make their evaluation. i think the confusion around the houthi saying they would target all coalition vessels has been a concern for the industry. we are saying that the threat remains the same, in its current state. if that escalation goes to land, more
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companies would assess that and start to make deviation. there are several layers of mitigation, in turnjob several layers of mitigation, in turn job watch keeping several layers of mitigation, in turnjob watch keeping routines. armed guards are used on these vessels. interaction between private and military organisations is the best. we proactively want to continue working with the uk military of defence to make sure we can provide that assurance for all vessels operating in the red sea. joshua, when you assess these attacks, what role do you think iran has to play? we attacks, what role do you think iran has to play?— has to play? we are aware that the houthi are iran _ has to play? we are aware that the houthi are iran backed _ has to play? we are aware that the houthi are iran backed and - has to play? we are aware that the houthi are iran backed and that. houthi are iran backed and that there is a link between that. i wouldn't want to make assumptions in terms of where these weapons systems are being procured from. i think
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there is probably a misunderstanding that a lot of vessel tracking and information is public earlier available. we have seen that vessels have been targeted further in 2023 incorrectly. i think there is that link in place and we will continue to monitor that that takes us further that the threat remains. thank you for your analysis. the cabin—mate of an albanian man believed to have taken his own life on a barge for asylum seekers in the uk, says he fears others will harm themselves if conditions aren't improved. leonard farruku died last month on the bibby stockholm vessel, which is moored off portland in dorset. his death is being investigated by the police and the coroner, and his funeral is taking place in albania today. our west of england correspondent danjohnson reports. then i started knock, knock, "are you ok, my friend, are you ok? they had to bring him
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out lying flat. with that, i was unconscious. we tried to do some first aid on him, tried to pump some oxygen. no answer. i think they should stop taking people there, because that place is not good for people. when these things happen, it's like a warning. yusuf was the last person to see leonard farruku alive, a fellow asylum seeker and his roommate on the bibby stockholm. he's very quiet. he likes to be by himself. he was sitting alone with his phone, playing, laughing on his phone. he liked to keep to himself. did he seem happy? yeah, yeah, yeah. he'll be laughing on the phone sometimes until one, two o'clock at night. maybe watching a comedy video on his phone. yeah, he's having fun time. so you didn't think he was struggling? yeah, yeah, yeah. at first, when i moved
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here, i didn't see any sign of that in him. but almost a month ago, leonard was found dead in the bathroom of their shared cabin. for the moment, inside the room, he went directly to the bathroom. he just said hello to me, went directly to the bathroom. and that was 12 hours before he was discovered early the next morning. and yusuf says he initially found it difficult to raise the alarm. i have to come there like three to four times. three to four times? yes, three to four times before they send someone to follow me. when they opened the door, they made him sit in the shower, like this. but the shower was off. he was was wearing his scarves and his gloves. at that time, they told me to step outside immediately. i have never seen a dead body in my life. he says many are struggling with life on the bibby stockholm and he still hears their complaints. the stress and anxiety, poor quality of food.
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this barge feels like a prison. the food is not good. the wifi they use to talk with family is not working properly. the security guys theat them like they are criminal. if you want to enter the barge, you have to go through some security checking and then the place looks like a prison, very isolating. and there's a fear about what this could lead to. we are trying to give warning that that place is not ok for them. they said every day the stress is increasing, it's getting worse, it's getting worse. so they decide to even kill themselves, because they don't have any hope for their life. the home office told us it takes the welfare of those in its care very seriously and that any concerns are swiftly addressed. it also highlighted the migrant help phone line, which is available 24/7 for anyone in need. leonard farruku's family raised thousands of pounds to return his body to albania. his funeral today marks the saddest
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end to a journey he made in hope. what lessons, if any, his death should teach us will be for his inquest to decide later this year. what do you think should happen to the bibby stockholm, then? yeah, i think they should stop taking people there, because that place is not good for people. they are running from persecution there. they thought when they would come here, they would have peace, they would have safety. then when they came back to seek asylum, they are treating them like they are criminal, like prisoners. stay with us here on bbc news. hello. our wind will have a little less bite to it over the next few days as we start to shift direction, away from it coming off the continent and more from the atlantic, this area of high pressure is starting to nudge a bit further southwards and bringing the air around it.
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but with it comes a lot more cloud and we're already seeing that today across eastern scotland, northern england, parts of northern ireland and north wales. the chance of some rain and sleet showers around, a bit of drizzle in places, too. but the far south of the country stays sunny through the rest of today and staying sunny as well in western parts of scotland where the winds are lightest. still a notable breeze for england and wales. that breeze at its coldest through the english channel. so 3 or 4 celsius in st helier and plymouth make feel closer to freezing elsewhere. temperatures by and large up on yesterday and closer to where we should be for the stage in the year. but still chilly. and a cold night to come tonight. there will be more cloud around, though, drifting southwards into parts of wales and the midlands. clearest conditions where we see the widespread frost, the blue colours on the chart, down to around —3, “4 in a few spots, same too in some sheltered parts of western scotland. most places, though, just above freezing into tomorrow morning. but the cloud will continue to work its way across more of england and wales tomorrow. a bright and sunny start and frosty start in the south, but that cloud will gradually encroach from the north. stays sunny, though, through the english channel
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towards the south—west of england, south wales, and stays reasonably sunny to western parts of scotland. elsewhere, sunshine, a few breaks here and there, but the cloud thick enough for a few light showers. temperatures up again a little bit on today. by friday, after a cold night across scotland and northern ireland with some mist and fog. some of that fog will linger all day. temperatures struggling to get above freezing. a lot more cloud elsewhere. but unlike what we are going to see over the next few days, eastern scotland will be favoured for the sunshine as winds start to come in from a slightly more westerly direction. that's as our high pressure shifts and then eventually splits this weekend, introducing weather fronts from the north, which will bring a few rain, maybe sleet, showers initially, but increasingly snow flurries as we go into sunday. so it will turn colder again as we go through the weekend, especially across the north. still plenty of cloud around, though, for many, and the chance ofjust one or two rain or sleet showers. but a greater chance of snow next week as cold northerly winds to begin with and then areas of low pressure push their way in. there is the chance of some more widespread and disruptive snow.
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still a long way off at the moment, though, but we'll keep you updated.
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a social media hack sends the price of bitcoin on a rollercoaster as speculation mounts that the us regulator will approve a new way to trade the cryptocurrency. and sleeping on thejob — how some workplaces injapan are trying novel ways to boost productivity.
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welcome to world business report, i'm tadhg enright. we start in the us where it could be a big day for bitcoin. the price of the cryptocurrency has been on a bit of a roller—coaster after the us securities and exchange commission account on x — formerly twitter — was hacked and a false post claimed it had approved the first ever exchange traded funds, or etfs, for spot trades in bitcoin. our business correspondent in new york, is erin delmore. if you are in the crypt or world, are curious about getting into it, then bitcoin etf might be on your radar. that would enable people to bet on gains and losses, even if they don't own any bitcoin themselves. us regulators are
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expected to approve the exchange traded funds this week. so, when a tweet was posted from the sec account saying exactly that... it was quickly posted that it was compromised. the regulator had not yet approved the listing and trading of spot bitcoin exchange traded products. the erroneous tweet also included a graphic, which only said $btc, bitcoin's ticker, was forced to bend it quickly climbed and then fell back down towards 115,000 with reality. now let's get the latest on the situation with boeing. the head of the aviation giant has said the company must acknowledge its mistake after a number of its planes have been found to have loose parts.
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investigations began after the cabin panel of a 737 max 9 jet blew off during an alaska airlines flight last week. it's the second major safety scandal to put the 737 max in spotlight; the first involved the deaths of 346 people in two crashes in ethiopia and indonesia. addressing employees at a factory in washington — where the planes are assembled — dave calhoun said boeing would approach the issue with complete transparency. we are going to approach this, number one, acknowledging our mistake. we are going to approach it with 100% and complete transparency every step of the way. we are going to work with the ntsb who is investigating the accident itself to find out what the cause is. we have a long experience with this group. they are as good as it gets. i trust every step they will take and they will get to a conclusion. i'm joined by professor graham
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braithwaite, director of transport systems, cranfield university. there is another point in dave carroll who in's addressed his employees, he became somewhat emotional, and said he has children and grandchildren and noted that the worst affected person in this flight was a child who had his shirt one. —— dave calhoun. what you think this speech will do to reassure customers and investors? i speech will do to reassure customers and investors?— and investors? i think we have seen and investors? i think we have seen a big difference _ and investors? i think we have seen a big difference in _ and investors? i think we have seen a big difference in how— and investors? i think we have seen a big difference in how boeing - a big difference in how boeing reacted to this event than it did when we have first two accidents. there is clearly acknowledgement that there is a problem to be solved, and there is also some humility, and you saw that in dave calhoun's reaction. that is incredibly important here. that openness is what gets aviation safety to the very high levels we
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usually achieve. in this case, recognising there may be a problem, working with that national transportation safety board, which is focused on the safety lessons, i think is the best way to recover the situation, and ifeel heartened by that. i quick as you mention there, there's an awful lot of introspection after those first 737 max incidents. you would wonder, with all the deep examination of these planes, how these loose bolts could have escaped attention? clearly the investigational want to get that answer as soon as it can. the ntsb have told us that that report may not come for a year or 18 months, which is why it is right the company takes immediate actions to minimise any risk that might be in the system. clearly they will look at the insurance processes, their end supplier chain, and that may
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involve other companies that delivered components, indeed the fuselage, into this built programme, and if that ntsb investigation find something that needs immediate action, we will know about that straightaway, and we won't have to wait 12 or 18 months. i think you will see rapid action here, and it is good to see the response from boeing seems to be very different this time. g; a, boeing seems to be very different this time. g; ~ . ., this time. the 737 max nine, a secific this time. the 737 max nine, a specific variant, _ this time. the 737 max nine, a specific variant, remains - this time. the 737 max nine, a - specific variant, remains grounded for now. you can imagine lots of air travellers out there questioning whether they want to get on one of these points. what you think it will take for boeing to restore confidence in them? i take for boeing to restore confidence in them? i think this transparency — confidence in them? i think this transparency that _ confidence in them? i think this transparency that we _ confidence in them? i think this transparency that we spoke - confidence in them? i think this l transparency that we spoke about yesterday will be a really important part of that, but i think we'll also look to the regulators to do their job will stop the federal aviation administration in the us took that immediate conservative step of grounding the specific variant of this aircraft. we are only talking
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about the max nine, of which there are no uk operators, and we are only talking about those that have a plug in this particular doorways, so there is a specific problem that has been dealt with here. there is an inspection programme that has been devised for that, and the feedback operators have suggested there are a few changes that. companies like united airlines, which have a large fleet of those planes are currently going through the insurance process. this is not simply a one company approach, it has won her many safety regulators are involved, and the aircraft is under scrutiny. we'll expect them to look very carefully at that. ., ~ expect them to look very carefully at that. ., ,, , ., ., at that. indeed. thank you for “oininr at that. indeed. thank you for joining us _ at that. indeed. thank you for joining us with _ at that. indeed. thank you for joining us with your— at that. indeed. thank you for joining us with your analysis l at that. indeed. thank you forl joining us with your analysis on that story. german commuters are coping with the first day of a three day strike on the country's railways today. it adds to the travel chaos
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in europe's largest economy, where ongoing protests by farmers have also snarled up the roads. dr ulrich hoppe is director general of the german—british chamber of commerce. we asked him how difficult this is making it for german businesses... if it's only for a few days, business will be able to adjust. but we don't know when the unions and the employers will come to an agreement. so, therefore it has created a lot of insecurity and as you have mentioned, the cargo trains are also on strike and that is an issue for businesses, especially from imports which come in from the ports and lots of containers are transported on rail. so the strike will work out and of course, the first three days of strikes, that might well be ok for businesses but if it's open ended and if there are more strikes to come, of course, that will add in terms of burden on businesses in germany. japan has long been known for its relentless work culture. employees are reluctant to go on holiday and almost no—one leaves the office before the boss.
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yet for more than 50 years, japan has ranked the lowest in employee productivity among the rich g7 nations. but as our tokyo correspondent shaimaa khalil has been finding out — some workplaces have been trying to do things differently. japan's salaryman and its notorious rush hour have become symbols of this workaholic society. pressure and expectations are so intense on employees here that the country coined the expression "death from overwork." and yet, for decades, this relentless hard work hasn't translated into overall productivity. this small company, however, is the opposite of anything you imagine a japanese workplace would be. makhura, which means pillow has a power nap policy. the company not only makes and sells pillows, it also encourages the employees to use them at work. i can't quite believe i'm saying this, but this is the most relaxing
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office space i've ever been in. and the secret is this. i'm speaking softly because employees around me are taking their naps for the day and i'm about to do the same. i'll be honest, it wasn't easy for me to doze off there. but after his 20 minute nap, naoki taguchi told me how this helps him work better. translation: in the afternoon, especially after lunch. _ i get sleepy and i'm not as focused. i also have to pick up my children from preschool so i can't stay longer for overtime. i need to be more productive within the limited time that i have. so for me, napping is important. it helps me work more efficiently. some coworking rental spaces have also caught on the idea. here you can pay for a space to work or rest using the space like energy pod. i'm not sure what it is, but it's too difficult for most
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japanese people to take naps at work. it still feels very wrong, like they're slacking off. i wanted to solve that issue. i think here it may be easier for someone to take nap among people they don't know. one japanese manufacturer has even addressed the issue of space or lack thereof. it may look like a phone booth, but this is the giraffe nap pod where you sleep standing up. translation: i use it once every day, but i try - to let my employees use it too, during their lunch break. by standing up, you take some load off your back. i always tell my friends i can sleep anywhere, even standing up. this is the first time i'm actually doing it. one big challenge facing the power nap champions is society's reluctance to change. tempting as it is, dozing off even for a little bit, still feels like a big leap forjapan's infamous work culture.
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sweet dreams in japan. in other news.... the food giant danone is cutting the price of most of its baby formula products in the uk after the competition regulator investigated why prices have been rising so dramatically. the company behind the aptamil range will reduce its prices by 7%. last month, the competition and markets authority said formula prices had risen by a quarter over the past two years. it said it was concerned that parents were more nervous about switching brands of baby formula compared with other products. the social media giant meta says it will hide more content from teens on instagram and facebook. in a blog post, the company said all teens will now be placed into the most restrictive content control settings on the apps. meta is under pressure, both in the us and europe, over allegations its apps are addictive and have helped fuel a youth mental health crisis. the rate of inflation in australia has fallen to a near two—year low in the month of november. data from the australian bureau of statistics showed its monthly consumer price index rose at an annual pace of 4.3%
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in november, the slowest since january 2022, and reinforcing market expectations that interest rates would not need to rise any further. markets now, and investors are still digesting that gloomy forecast from the world bank yesterday. it warned that the global economy on course for its weakest year of growth since the pandemic and described the 2020s as a decade of wasted opportunity. that is the picture they are on the european indices, the main losses being taken by the ftse 100, european indices, the main losses being taken by the ftse100, 0.3%. that is your business needs. goodbye. this agricultural land could be the site of a new housing development. peter is one of around 300 campaigners against the plan. you
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can make this piece of land covers 35 hectares, and glad men developments are proposing to build over 400 developments are proposing to build over 40! ., , , developments are proposing to build over40t ., , , ., developments are proposing to build over 40! ., , , ., ., over 400 houses on it. the water levels are — over 400 houses on it. the water levels are gradually _ over 400 houses on it. the water levels are gradually seeping - over 400 houses on it. the water levels are gradually seeping up . over 400 houses on it. the water. levels are gradually seeping up onto this land, which would be a disaster to build on. i this land, which would be a disaster to build on— to build on. i think it would definitely _ to build on. i think it would definitely make _ to build on. i think it would definitely make the - to build on. i think it would | definitely make the flooding to build on. i think it would - definitely make the flooding issue worse. _ definitely make the flooding issue worse, because they are going to concrete — worse, because they are going to concrete over what is now wetland, which _ concrete over what is now wetland, which can _ concrete over what is now wetland, which can drain through, whereas houses _ which can drain through, whereas houses it— which can drain through, whereas houses it doesn't drain through, it williust_ houses it doesn't drain through, it williust run— houses it doesn't drain through, it willjust run off. you houses it doesn't drain through, it willjust run off.— houses it doesn't drain through, it willjust run off. will 'ust run off. you can see today it is willjust run off. you can see today it is completely — willjust run off. you can see today it is completely under _ willjust run off. you can see today it is completely under water, - willjust run off. you can see today it is completely under water, so i i it is completely under water, so i don't know how they would propose to build pathways, because presumably they will get washed away on an annual basis.— they will get washed away on an annual basis. , . ., ., , , annual basis. gladman developments declined an interview, _ annual basis. gladman developments declined an interview, but _ annual basis. gladman developments declined an interview, but they - annual basis. gladman developments declined an interview, but they said l declined an interview, but they said there will be measures to manage
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surface and increase flood resilience. hello from the bbc sport centre. we start in england, and it was another frustrating night for chelsea, who failed to score for the sixth time this season — losing 1—0 to middlesborough in the semifinal of the league cup.
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the championship side go into the second leg with a slight advantage after hayden hackney scored the only goal at the riverside stadium. chelsea manager mauricio pochettino could only watch as his side missed chance after chance in front of goal. winger cole palmer was particularly dishearted after failing to capitalise on three golden opportunities to score. after the match, middlebrough head coach michael carrick said he was pleased, but that it would be a different story at stamford bridge, while pochettino acknowldeged it was only half time, and that his side couldn't so wasteful in the second leg. i think we made some mistake in the first half, we are punished for that. we created big chances, and we were not clinical enough, that is so clear. other games, you can maybe talk in different ways. we have 15 days, two weeks, we are going to have the second tie and be positive
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that we can win the game and go to the final. tonight was a really special night, the atmosphere, he scoring, it was such a _ the atmosphere, he scoring, it was such a good — the atmosphere, he scoring, it was such a good night for us. we have to take it _ such a good night for us. we have to take it as— such a good night for us. we have to take it as a _ such a good night for us. we have to take it as a and enjoy that, and the second _ take it as a and enjoy that, and the second leg — take it as a and enjoy that, and the second leg as a whole new ball game, and we _ second leg as a whole new ball game, and we know what we are walking into the challenges challenges we face, and how— the challenges challenges we face, and how we got an advantage, have we not at _ and how we got an advantage, have we not at this— and how we got an advantage, have we not at this stage? you could argue not, because we know that it will be tough _ not, because we know that it will be tough. there's a lot to take in, really — tough. there's a lot to take in, really -- _ tough. there's a lot to take in, really. —— hayden scoring. there's a madrid derby later as real and atletico face each other in the semi—final of the spanish super cup. the match is being held in saudi arabia with either barcelona or osasuna awaiting the winner in sunday s final. it's the first of three clashes, in three competitions, in three weeks, for the two teams. atletico manager diego simeone says he always enjoys playing real,
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but carlo ancelotti says the derbies are a challenge and while the fans look forward to them, he doesn't! translation: i personally do not en'o translation: i personally do not enjoy playing _ translation: i personally do not enjoy playing against _ translation: i personally do not enjoy playing against atletico - enjoy playing against atletico madrid, because they are one of the best teams, and playing against them is always difficult, but we have to do it. i'm sure they feel the same about us. we are two very strong teams, and it's hard to face each other. it is what it is, and i'm sure the fans will enjoy it. translation: this is obviously different from _ translation: this is obviously different from the _ translation: this is obviously different from the league, - translation: this is obviously| different from the league, which translation: this is obviously i different from the league, which is a long _ different from the league, which is a long competition. this is obviously much, much shorter. we are playing _ obviously much, much shorter. we are playing real— obviously much, much shorter. we are playing real madrid, who knows what will happen. we do what we always do, will happen. we do what we always do. and _ will happen. we do what we always do, and play game by game. they are a great _ do, and play game by game. they are a great rival, — do, and play game by game. they are a great rival, that makes us enthusiastic, excited even, and as always. _ enthusiastic, excited even, and as always. the — enthusiastic, excited even, and as always, the expectations are high. the australian open starts on sunday in melbourne and seeding for the first grand slam of the year
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has been announced with defending champions novak djokovic and iga swiatek top seeds for the mens and women's singles. serbian, djokovic, who won his 11th title in melbourne last year, is the top seed at a grand slam for the first time since wimbledon 2022. he'll be entering the tournament after an injury scare at the united cup, where serbia were knocked out by australia in the quarterfinals. carlos alcaraz is second seed, daniil medvedev is third. staying with tennis, and new rules have been introduced which should prevent matches running after 11pm on both the atp and wta tours. the tours have announced no more than five matches per day should be scheduled on each court in an attempt to cut down on late finishes, which they say "negatively impact "players and fa ns". in 2022, alex zverev beatjenson brooksby at 4:55 am in alcapulco — that's the latest ever finish to a professional match. tournaments will still be able to request waivers based on weather
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conditions or local cultural traditions in exceptional circumstances. let's take you to america now, where toronto raptors coach darko rajakovic was very upset after their 132—131 loss to the la lakers, saying he believed the officials "never gave his side a chance". the raptors stuck with the lakers for most of the game, but anthony davis hit two free throws late on for the victory. a three—pointer for toronto on the buzzer wasn't enough to tie the match and rajakovic made his feelings very clear at full time. shame for the referees, shame for the league to allow this. 23 free throws for them, and we get to mac? in the fourth quarter? how to play the game? how possible is scotty barnes, an all—star player in this league, he goes every single time to the rim with force, and get to the
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room without flopping and not trying to get phone calls, he gets two free throws for the whole game? how's that possible? how can you to me? without a win tonight? if that is the case, just show up and fight us now, —— we won't show up, let us know. just give them the win. elsewhere, domantas sabonis scored 37 points to help the sacramento kings to a 131—110 victory over the detroit pistons. the kings trailed by 20 points in the first quarter but recovered and, despite a late fightback from their opponents, they were able to hold on for victory. and that's all the sport for now. you're watching bbc news. i'm nicky schiller. we will be live in the commons shortly for prime minister's questions. we are expecting that rishi sunak will address the post office scandal — that has been dominating the headlines since
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the itv drama last week. this morning, the minister responsible for the post office, kevin hollinrake, said the government was "very, very close" to announcing its plans to clear hundreds of sub postmasters who were wrongly convicted because of the faulty horizon it system. of course, it makes my life easier as postal minister to convince other parts of government and the opposition and others to do something very, very significant. i welcome that. to say nothing has been happening is just absolutely not the truth. both myself and my predecessors, they have been absolutely determined to deal with this. but what you are talking about potentially, which is a blanket overturning of convictions, some legislation that does that, interferes with the courts, the courts are independent in this country for a good reason. it is a very significant legal step we may be about to take. so that's why i can't give you an answer right now but i hope to give you an answer very shortly. more than 700 branch managers were given criminal convictions — only 93 of these convictions
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have been overturned. i spoke to nicki arch — who ran the chalford hill post office near stroud in gloucestershire — and was wrongly accused of stealing £24,000. i asked to her tell me what happened. i was running a business, a little shop, at the local post office. shop, and the local post office. i had the auditors come investigators turn up. they closed me down immediately. i was eventually charged, once they had splashed all over the local newspapers that i had stolen money off of elderly people. two years after that, i did a three and a half day crown court appearance and defended myself and luckily, thejury found me not guilty. but by then it was too late, two years on, everything had gone, everything had been ruined. my reputation was in pieces. yes, it was hideous. but, you know, 24 years on nearly now and the fight continues.
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absolutely. you have been listening to what the minister said on bbc breakfast and he said that a new route is very, very close. what would you like the government to do? actually do something. the talk is cheap. we have heard all this before. you know, you have got to understand that the government own the post office, it in their best interest to protect themselves and their colleagues who have got involvement in this. and their needs always come before ours. so, it's easy to say, yes, we are going to be doing this. "everyone apply." my claim for compensation has been in four months and months now and nobody has done a single thing about it.
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so, you know, the talk is very good. this is the first time we have had the whole nation behind us and all the media which is just fantastic. let's see as an entity whether we can actually get them to do something. we can talk about it, they can talk about it and answer our questions but we want action. we want to see them actually do something, not talk about it. talk is not good enough any more. how surprised have you been to the public reaction to the itv drama? this has been going on, as you well know, for decades but suddenly people are now talking about it. i have got friends who are literally talking to me about it and saying, "have you seen...? "why has this taken so long? "why has this not been sorted?" it's fantastic, isn't it?
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we have tried. we had nick wallace's book, we had lance neilson's play. we have tried everything to get it out into the public. you know, as a group we just keep trying and thinking of ways we can try and get the media to pick it up. we never thought... it was always going to be that the drama was going to be very good and it was very... too close to comfort, it was very real. too close for comfort, it was very real. so for the public and media to get behind us now is just fantastic. it's what we needed. it's what we have been fighting for the two decades now. for for two decades now. now we have got it, we can't thank them enough. you know, just to see public�*s emotions come through who have had nothing to do with it, the belief that they have, it means everything to all of us.
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you know, we have shouted from the rooftops our innocence for so long but there is nothing better than having the real people of this country supporting us. it's just fantastic. yeah. that is nicky arce, who was wrongly accused of stealing £24,000. live now to our political correspondent, harry farley who's at westminster and will be watching prime so we heard from the minister a plan is very close — could that be today? often things build up to something being announced on wednesday so the prime and struck another response to questions he could be getting any minute now from mps, and also the leader of the labour party, sir keir starmer, from what the government is doing. the government says they are
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very close to finding a solution. but they are trying to do is overturn the hundreds of convictions that still remain, criminal convictions that still remain for those sub—postmasters. they were wrongly convicted after the horizon it system made it look like money was disappearing from branch accounts, when it wasn't. what the government has talked about was possibly, they are actively considering a bill, a new law that would quash all of those convictions in one go. i think it'sjust would quash all of those convictions in one go. i think it's just worth stressing how extraordinary and unprecedented, even, that would be. it would be politicians, the government, overturning a decision, evenif government, overturning a decision, even if the decision was wrong, made in a criminal court. in this country, the courts are independent from the government. there are some hesitation, concern from some mps that this would be politicians and mps interfering in matters of the
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independent court, but the counterpoint is that this is an extraordinary miscarriage of justice, it is unprecedented, and it needs an extraordinary response. we'll properly see some of that debate play out in the house of commons in a few minutes, when rishi sunak does see those questions from mps. �* ., ., , ., , , mps. are there other options if they don't no mps. are there other options if they don't go for — mps. are there other options if they don't go for the _ mps. are there other options if they don't go for the one-off— mps. are there other options if they don't go for the one-off law? - mps. are there other options if they don't go for the one-off law? there| don't go for the one-off law? there are other options, _ don't go for the one-off law? there are other options, one _ don't go for the one-off law? there are other options, one of— don't go for the one-off law? there are other options, one of which - don't go for the one-off law? there are other options, one of which is l don't go for the one—off law? tues are other options, one of which is a royal pardon, which is where the convictions aren't overturned, they are pardoned. they say we are going to disregard those convictions. a number of the postmasters have said they might not be satisfied with that, because we do not want to be pardoned, we want it recognised that we were never guilty in the first place. that is one option facing the government, they could go down the line of a royal pardon. the other option, which david davis, the former cabinet minister has spoken about, is allowing a mass appeal. the normal way you will return a
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criminal conviction is that it is the criminal cases review commission, and that is often taken to the court of appeal on an individual basis, case—by—case it goes to appeal, and the other option is to have a mass appeal, where they all can go in one go. there are different options, the government has talked up this option of a bill, a new law that would quash them all in one go. we don't know what that is confirmed, we haven't had confirmation about that, but government ministers are talking up that option, saying they're actively considering it. that might come as soon as today. ii considering it. that might come as soon as today-— soon as today. if they do get all clear, soon as today. if they do get all clear. there _ soon as today. if they do get all clear, there is _ soon as today. if they do get all clear, there is still _ soon as today. if they do get all clear, there is still the - soon as today. if they do get all clear, there is still the massive| clear, there is still the massive issue of compensation, isn't athere is, but in issue of compensation, isn't athere is. but in many _ issue of compensation, isn't athere is, but in many ways _ issue of compensation, isn't athere is, but in many ways to _ issue of compensation, isn't athere is, but in many ways to hold - issue of compensation, isn't athere is, but in many ways to hold up- issue of compensation, isn't athere| is, but in many ways to hold up with compensation is that legally, in many cases, that can't be granted until there is an outstanding criminal conviction. you need to unpick the criminal conviction. brute unpick the criminal conviction. we are going to go straight to the
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commons. you. the arise in post office scandal saw hundreds of innocent people sent to prison, people like former constituents of mine who went to jailfor former constituents of mine who went to jail for three years former constituents of mine who went to jailfor three years —— and during this candle for three years the leader of the liberal democrats was the minister in charge of the post office. and this is the same liberal democrat leader who in the past has called for the resignation of over 30 prominent people in this country who have made mistakes in theirjobs, so does the prime minister agree with me that the leader of the lib dems should take his own advice, start by clearing his own advice, start by clearing his desk, clearing his diary, and clearing off? mr his desk, clearing his diary, and clearing off?— his desk, clearing his diary, and clearing off? mr speaker, this is one of the _ clearing off? mr speaker, this is one of the greatest _ clearing off? mr speaker, this isj one of the greatest miscarriages clearing off? mr speaker, this is i one of the greatest miscarriages of justice in our nation pot history, people who worked hard to serve their communities had their and reputations destroyed for absolutely
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no fault of their own. the victims must get justice no fault of their own. the victims must getjustice and compensation. the inquiry is undertaken crucial work to expose what went wrong and we have paid almost hundred and £50 million in compensation to over 2500 victims but today i can announce that we will introduce new primary legislation to make sure that those convicted as a result of the horizon scandal are swiftly exonerated and compensated. we will also introduce a new upfront payment of £75,000 for the group of postmasters, and can i thank of thirsk and malton for all his hard work and out shortly. we will make sure that the truth comes to light, right the wrongs of the past and the victims get the justice they deserve. past and the victims get the 'ustice they deservafi past and the victims get the 'ustice they deservefi they deserve. leader of the opposition. _ they deserve. leader of the opposition, keir— they deserve. leader of the opposition, keir starmer. l they deserve. leader of the i opposition, keir starmer. thank they deserve. leader of the - opposition, keir starmer. thank you, mr s-eaker opposition, keir starmer. thank you, mr speaker and _ opposition, keir starmer. thank you, mr speaker and i heard _ opposition, keir starmer. thank you, mr speaker and i heard what - opposition, keir starmer. thank you, mr speaker and i heard what the i mr speaker and i heard what the prime ministerjust said about the post office scandal. it is a huge
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injustice. people lost their lives, their liberty and their livelihood and they have been waiting far too long for the truth, justice and for compensation, so i'm glad the prime minister is putting forward a proposal. we will look at the details i think it's the job of all of us to make sure that it delivers the justice that is so needed. back in 2022, when borisjohnson claimed he would send asylum seekers to rwanda, one ambitious tory had problems, he said it was a waste of money, wouldn't work and it was one of a long line of gimmicks. does the prime minister know what happened to that mp? mr prime minister know what happened to that mp? ~ ,,, ., ~ ., ., that mp? mr speaker, what that honourable _ that mp? mr speaker, what that honourable gentlemen - that mp? mr speaker, what that honourable gentlemen refers i that mp? mr speaker, what that honourable gentlemen refers to | that mp? mr speaker, what that i honourable gentlemen refers to is a
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document that he has not seen, i haven't seen and has been reported second hand in a bunch of media newspapers. but what i can tell him is that i am absolutely clear that you do need to stop the boats, and this is what this government and that mp is going to deliver. i notice he didn't deny it, mr speaker. i'm not surprised. £400 million of taxpayer money down the drain, no one sent to rwanda and small boats still coming. it's hardly a surprise he wanted to scrap the scheme when he was trying to sneak in as tory leader. but he has been caught red—handed opposing the very thing that he has now made his flagship policy. which member should we listen to? the one before us today or the one who used to believe in something?
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mr speaker, i've always been crystal clear. you do need to have an effective deterrent to finally solve this problem and in fact the national crime agency agree that you need, in their words, national crime agency agree that you need, in theirwords, an national crime agency agree that you need, in their words, an effective removals and deterrence agreement which is why after becoming prime minister i negotiated in a deal with albania, thanks to which, we have seen a 93% drop in illegal arrivals from albania. that is how australia stopped the boats and why italy, germany and austria are looking at similar schemes. germany and austria are looking at similarschemes. he is germany and austria are looking at similar schemes. he is the only one who is opposed to a proper deterrent, not because it doesn't work, because he doesn't actually believe in controlling migration. every single time he picks the people smugglers over the british people. mr people smugglers over the british neale, ~ .,, ., ~' people smugglers over the british theole. ~ , ., people smugglers over the british neale, ~ , ., , people. mr speaker, we should smash the ttans,
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people. mr speaker, we should smash the gangs. process — people. mr speaker, we should smash the gangs, process the _ people. mr speaker, we should smash the gangs, process the claims - people. mr speaker, we should smash the gangs, process the claims and i the gangs, process the claims and end hotel use. that's our plan. unlike the prime minister, i believe in it. �* ., ., ., in it. i'm going to hear the questions- _ in it. i'm going to hear the questions. i— in it. i'm going to hear the questions. i don't - in it. i'm going to hear the questions. i don't want i questions. i don't want interruptions, please. it's very important— interruptions, please. it's very important and a very important topic and i_ important and a very important topic and i take _ important and a very important topic and i take it — important and a very important topic and i take it seriously and i hope members — and i take it seriously and i hope members also wish to start taking it seriously _ members also wish to start taking it seriousl . ., . members also wish to start taking it seriousl . . , , ., , ., seriously. last year he started the ear seriously. last year he started the year saying _ seriously. last year he started the year saying he _ seriously. last year he started the year saying he was _ seriously. last year he started the year saying he was mr _ seriously. last year he started the year saying he was mr steady i seriously. last year he started the | year saying he was mr steady then seriously. last year he started the i year saying he was mr steady then at his conference he was mr change, and now he has flipped back to mr more of the saints, it doesn't matter how many flip—flops he does, he will always be mr nobody. —— more of the same. here is the tragedy of his leadership, he spends the whole time and trying to convince people not to believe their own eyes, pretending that debt is falling, that the economy is going gangbusters, the nhs is in great shape, and when he finally find something he was right about, the rwanda gimmick, he can't even take credit for it. when is he
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going to stop pretending that up is down, the black is white and admit that whether it is the economy, immigration, the nhs, he has failed? let'sjust go through immigration, the nhs, he has failed? let's just go through his checklist. he talks about the backlog. hundred and decisions made last year, a higher number than in any year in the past two decades —— 120,000 the past two decades ——120,000 decisions. we talked about hotels. the first 50 are being closed and there are more to come, and he talks about the numbers. they were down by over one third last year, the first time that has happened, and then he talked about smashing the gangs. if he does care about smashing the gangs, why doesn't he own up to the fact that when it came to the nationality and borders act, he blocked, delayed and voted against the powers in that act which have allowed us to now arrest hundreds and hundreds of people connected
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with that illegal trade who have been sentenced to hundreds of years in prison. he opposed that because he chooses the criminal gangs over the british people every time. i don't think we are. keir starmer. mr speaker. — i don't think we are. keir starmer. mr speaker, we can all see what has happened here. just like you know that debt isn't falling and taxes are going up, he knows the rwanda gimmick won't work. but he can't be honest about it because he's too scared of his own mps. doesn't he wish he had stuck to his guns rather than allow himself to be taken hostage by his own party? mr s-eaker, hostage by his own party? mr speaker, we are debating this because we have taken a stand and are delivering the toughest migration plan ever to end the legal challenges and actually get flights
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off the ground. let's be clear about this. he doesn't have a single practical idea about how to stop the boats. that's because he doesn't actually care about controlling migration. this is a person who described all immigration law as a racist, mr speaker. he thinks limits on economic migration are in his words economic vandalism. it didn't feature once in his five missions and he didn't mention it once in his conference speech. the truth is, he is pro—free movement, anti—border control and never be trusted to stop the boats. i control and never be trusted to stop the boats. .. control and never be trusted to stop the boats. ~ , ., , ., , the boats. i think we should smash the ttans, the boats. i think we should smash the gangs. and _ the boats. i think we should smash the gangs. and i — the boats. i think we should smash the gangs, and i spent _ the boats. i think we should smash the gangs, and i spent five - the boats. i think we should smash the gangs, and i spent five years i the boats. i think we should smash the gangs, and i spent five years ofj the gangs, and i spent five years of my life doing exactly that. this is the party that has lost control of the party that has lost control of the borders, and whilst he is tending to the tory party, the country is left without government stop a collapse in dentistry leaving
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people literally pulling out their own teeth. flood defences completely exposed, hundreds of thousands of children still out of school. his government appears blissfully uninterested in what is going on outside of the walls of westminster. does he realise how ludicrous it looks when he spends his time posting while britain is breaking —— boasting. i posting while britain is breaking -- boastint. ., posting while britain is breaking -- boastint. . ., , ., , boasting. i am glad he brought up our schools _ boasting. i am glad he brought up our schools because _ boasting. i am glad he brought up our schools because there - boasting. i am glad he brought up our schools because there is i boasting. i am glad he brought up i our schools because there is nothing more important than ensuring children get a world—class education and i'm pleased in spite of the labour party opposing every reform we made, our children are now the best readers in the western world. but he is right that attendance is important and that's why we are investing millions of pounds more to provide support for absent pupils and launched a national campaign just this week and doubled the number of attendants helps to support over 1000 of the most vulnerable schools. but i am surprised to hear him raise the
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topic because from longer lockdown or voting against minimum service laws, his priority has always been keeping our children out of school. it's always the same with him. there is no plan, it isjust peddling one thing to his union friends and another thing to the british people. new year, new nonsense. every week he stands here and tells the country they should be thanking him, not questioning him. point out that the view on the ground is very different to that from his private jet and he says, you are talking the country down. hejust doesn't says, you are talking the country down. he just doesn't get it. he doesn't get what a cost of living crisis feels like. he doesn't know any schools where people's kids no longer turn up and he doesn't understand what it's like to wait for a hospital appointment. doesn't the country deserve so much better than a prime minister who simply doesn't get britain? last
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than a prime minister who simply doesn't get britain?— than a prime minister who simply doesn't get britain? last week we had et doesn't get britain? last week we had yet another _ doesn't get britain? last week we had yet another half-hour - doesn't get britain? last week we had yet another half-hour speech | had yet another half—hour speech from the honourable gentleman, and what a surprise, yet again, it didn't contain a single new idea. we've had four years of him as labour leader and it is still all slogan, no plan. just this weekend we are delivering on our plan to cut people's taxes. he doesn't have a plan. we got a plan to stop the boats. it doesn't have a plan. we got a plan to get people off welfare and into work, and he doesn't have a single idea. it's crystal clear. stick with us to deliver the long—term change that the country needs. don't go back to square one with him. let needs. don't go back to square one with him. ., ., needs. don't go back to square one with him. . ., , ., with him. let him ask a question before you _ with him. let him ask a question before you ask— with him. let him ask a question before you ask for _ with him. let him ask a question before you ask for more. - with him. let him ask a question before you ask for more. we i with him. let him ask a question i before you ask for more. we know it's ttoin before you ask for more. we know it's going to _ before you ask for more. we know it's going to be — before you ask for more. we know it's going to be fantastic— before you ask for more. we know it's going to be fantastic and i before you ask for more. we know it's going to be fantastic and a i it's going to be fantastic and a happy new year to you anyway. it's
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almost spring when a young man's fancy turns to tax. in scotland, the nationalists have decided to increase taxes on hard—working people and in wales being clobbered by a 5% increase on rates. does my right honourable friend agree with me there's only one party in this chamber that can be trusted to cut for hard—working people across the country, and that is the conservative party? mt; country, and that is the conservative pa ? g ., ., conservative party? my honourable friend is absolutely _ conservative party? my honourable friend is absolutely right. _ conservative party? my honourable friend is absolutely right. we i conservative party? my honourable friend is absolutely right. we are i friend is absolutely right. we are just this weekend seeing an average person in the work seeing their taxes cut by £450 and in wales with labour in charge, they are raising them with businesses there now seeing double the rate of business rates this year and it's the same in scotland under the snp. the new high tax capital of the uk, because of the snp's tax hiking decisions, so while we have a plan in cutting your taxes, it is labour and the snp who are going to raise them.
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the horizon system introduced by tony blair the famous labour party leader and a knights of the garter, the horizon system defended by the current leader of the liberal democrats, himself a knight bachelor and a scandal overseen by a former conservative prime minister who now hides in the house of lords is a baron. the reality is that sub—postmaster is never stood a chance against the westminster establishment, did they? shes chance against the westminster establishment, did they? as i've said, this establishment, did they? as i've said. this is _ establishment, did they? as i've said, this is actually _ establishment, did they? as i've said, this is actually one - establishment, did they? as i've said, this is actually one of- establishment, did they? as i've said, this is actually one of the l said, this is actually one of the greatest miscarriages ofjustice in our country's history and all of our thoughts are with those who work so hard for their communities and have seen their and reputations destroyed and since the scandal, as the honourable general pointed out, has unfolded over decades and with
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multiple people clearly at fault, but since 2019 and the high court case, this government established a statutory inquiry to uncover what went wrong and established an independent advisory board and has established three different compensation scheme is paying out £150 million to over 2500 people with almost two thirds having received final compensation, but we must go further and faster. which is why we have made new announcements today. i faster. which is why we have made new announcements today.- new announcements today. i don't think the prime _ new announcements today. i don't think the prime minister _ new announcements today. i don't think the prime minister quite i new announcements today. i don't| think the prime minister quite gets it. it's notjust a plague on all of their houses, it's a plague on this house itself because injustice goes far beyond just the sub postmasters. just ask the victims of the equitable life scandal and the victims of the infected blood scandal or the victims families from grenfell or hillsborough. the reality is that when the public come knocking on the doors of this
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chamber is seeking justice, the government only ever answers when they have no options left. the leader of the opposition said last week that the public are right to be angry at westminster, and they are angry at westminster, and they are angry at westminster, and they are angry at westminster. they are angry at westminster because they know that this place never really changes, does it, prime minister? actually, i am sad that the honourable gentleman is trying to politicise something that has happened over multiple decades. the key thing is after the 2019 high court case, the government did act to establish an independent inquiry, independent compensation schemes and has paid out compensation to 2500 people. ratherthan has paid out compensation to 2500 people. rather than politicising it, we should be focusing on the people affected and making sure they get the answers, justice and compensation that they deserve and thatis compensation that they deserve and that is what we are delivering. i
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made a promise to a grandad in my constituency after he told me he hadn't dared speak up when his grandson came home saying, today we were learning if we were in the wrong body. draft schools guidance to support gender—questioning children has now been published just before christmas and its out to public consultation but when we've all seen many individual people very publicly cancelled, lost theirjobs, their reputation, their relationships. please supporting biological reality or championing fairness, women's safety, child protection, can i ask my right honourable friend how will honest and open engagement be managed through this very important and sensitive consultation process? flan sensitive consultation process? can i thank my honourable friend for her important question and assure her that she's right about the safety and well—being of children being
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paramount in our thoughts and that is at the heart of the guidance we have published for consultation. but also, parents fundamentally must be involved in decisions about their children's lives and their involvement is a key part of this guidance. she is right to say there is a consultation process, that is an opportunity for everyone to engage with this guidance and she's also right to say and i agree that those championing safety or indeed talking about the importance of biological sex should absolutely have the freedom to express those views and she will see those expressed in the guidance too. i want to thank the prime minister for the 3.3 billion financial package which is now available to any restored northern ireland executive. however, we still need a discussion around the long—term financial framework before the next spending review. at present northern ireland is a huge crisis especially in health and there are urgent public sector pay pressures which must be
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addressed. last month the secretary of state said that the negotiations with the dup over at the windsor framework have concluded. does the prime minister recognise the real dangers of continued adrift in northern ireland and the urgent need for it to have a government? flan northern ireland and the urgent need for it to have a government? can i thank the honourable _ for it to have a government? can i thank the honourable gentleman for his question. ourfocus has always been on delivering for the people of northern ireland who rightly expect and deserve their locally elected decision—makers to address the issues that matter to them. we held talks with the dup and believe that significant progress has been made and that there is now a very good basis for the executive to be restored. i thank him for his comments about the £3 million financial package and with that there is a real chance to restore there is a real chance to restore the executive, resolve pay for public sector workers rapidly and get northern ireland and its public services moving again. the annalee wa b services moving again. the annalee way by passing _ services moving again. the annalee way by passing lee _ services moving again. the annalee way by passing lee was _ services moving again. the annalee way by passing lee was first - way by passing lee was first proposed 60 years ago but to this
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day remains unfinished. i met with representatives of councils and the mayor of greater manchester and i'm pleased to say an agreement in principle has been brought forward for proposals to complete the bypass. would you like to throw his support behind this project? flan bypass. would you like to throw his support behind this project? can i support behind this pro'ect? can i commend support behind this pro'ect? can i comment my * support behind this project? can i commend my honourable friend for all his work in this important project. i know the rail minister is meeting with my honourable friend to discuss this proposal and make sure that we can deliver things like this and as part of network north there will be significant new funding announced for local highway improvements and i would encourage my honourable friend to work with stakeholders on this important scheme and make sure they can pick that funding when it becomes available. flan can pick that funding when it becomes available.— can pick that funding when it becomes available. can i ask the prime minister _ becomes available. can i ask the prime minister whether - becomes available. can i ask the
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prime minister whether he i becomes available. can i ask the i prime minister whether he personally met... priorto him prime minister whether he personally met... prior to him giving him £38,000 for the hire of a private jet? bill £38,000 for the hire of a private 'et? �* , £38,000 for the hire of a private 'et? , ., .,, £38,000 for the hire of a private 'et? , ., ., £38,000 for the hire of a private 'et? �* , . ., ., ., , ., ., jet? all my declarations are made in the usual way _ jet? all my declarations are made in the usual way according _ jet? all my declarations are made in the usual way according to _ jet? all my declarations are made in the usual way according to the i jet? all my declarations are made in the usual way according to the usual processes. the the usual way according to the usual trocesses. ~ . the usual way according to the usual trocesses. ~ , ~ ., , processes. the prime minister knows i set u- processes. the prime minister knows i set up and — processes. the prime minister knows i set up and chaired _ processes. the prime minister knows i set up and chaired the _ processes. the prime minister knows i set up and chaired the caucus i processes. the prime minister knows i set up and chaired the caucus of- i set up and chaired the caucus of 35 conservative member of parliament who have written's longest river flowing through their constituencies, the river severn. we've submitted a business case to the chancellor for 500 million to finally tame the river severn and i know that his officials are currently looking at those proposals. to tame the river severn will lead to a uplift in the west midlands of 150 billion. the prime minister has seen this week the horrendous damage and misery caused in shropshire and all the way along the river severn of this river
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flooding yet again. we really do need to see now in the spring budget further assistance for communities like mine to finally deal with these annual floods. like mine to finally deal with these annualfloods. flan like mine to finally deal with these annual floods.— like mine to finally deal with these annual floods. can i start by saying my thoughts _ annual floods. can i start by saying my thoughts are — annual floods. can i start by saying my thoughts are with _ annual floods. can i start by saying my thoughts are with all— annual floods. can i start by saying my thoughts are with all of- annual floods. can i start by saying my thoughts are with all of those l my thoughts are with all of those affected by the devastating impact of storm henk and the flooding we've seen, including those in my honourable friend's constituency. action is already being undertaken under our six year 5.2 billion investment programme to better protect land across the river severn catchment area and elsewhere but i know that the flooding minister met my honourable friend along with the environment agency in his constituencyjust before christmas to discuss the specific plans he mentions. i know the chancellor has received and started reviewing it, can i show him the environment agency is working closely with other partners to explore his plans in more detailfurther? partners to explore his plans in more detail further?— more detail further? since the outbreak of — more detail further? since the outbreak of war _
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more detail further? since the outbreak of war in _ more detail further? since the outbreak of war in gaza, i more detail further? since the outbreak of war in gaza, over| more detail further? since the - outbreak of war in gaza, over 23,000 palestinians have been killed including 10,000 children and. displacement is causing a humanitarian catastrophe. there is intensifying fighting between hezbollah and israel, crisis in shipping security and the engulfing of neighbouring countries into a regional conflict. de—escalation will only occur when hostilities ceased in gaza. the foreign secretary yesterday said he was worried israel may have broken international law and the international court ofjustice is opening hearings in the hague this week in relation to suspected breaches of obligations under the geneva convention. will the prime minister make public legal advice our government requested and received on suspected breaches of international law by israel and the implications for uk policy, including relevant arms exports? iestate including relevant arms exports? we continue to call for international humanitarian law to be respected and civilians to be protected. and that
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is what our current legal assessments say it's happening. as the foreign secretary outlined yesterday that israel plans to act within international humanitarian law and has the ability to do so. but we are also deeply concerned about the impact on civilian population in gaza, that's why we've trebled the amount of aid that we are providing to the region and just recently we sent our first maritime shipment to egypt, uk military ship delivered over 80 tonnes of new blankets and life—saving medical equipment for gaza and we are working withjordan more land routes and will continue to do everything we can to support the vulnerable people being impacted by what's happening on the ground. in my constituency the new hillingdon hospital has full planning permission, funding and enabling works is well under way.
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would my right honourable friend the prime minister agree with me that this new state—of—the—art hospital will uplift the health benefits for the residents and would hejoin me in visiting the project site at a time when his diary allows? mt; time when his diary allows? my honourable friend has been a fantastic campaigner for the new hillingdon hospital and i agree with him that it will provide fantastic care to him and his constituents as well and i'm pleased that planning permission and funding has now been granted for the site and work is progressing. i will look at my diary but in the meantime i can tell him that my right honourable friend the health secretary will be very happy to come and visit his project and see the significant progress for herself. ., . , ., see the significant progress for herself. , ., , , herself. last year my constituents had to wait _ herself. last year my constituents had to wait months _ herself. last year my constituents had to wait months for— herself. last year my constituents had to wait months for an - herself. last year my constituentsj had to wait months for an election to finally be confirmed, with uncertainty repeatedly prolonged seemingly out of self—interest. now this year, out of all people i didn't expect the prime minister to
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be turning to my predecessor for strategic inspiration. if we are going to be waiting i hope we can work together. what the prime minister meet with some fantastic carers in mid bedfordshire to talk about how we can progress the strategy, make it go further faster and crucially why bedfordshire might be a fantastic place for one of the proposed areas? flan be a fantastic place for one of the proposed areas?— be a fantastic place for one of the proposed areas? can i pay tribute to all kinshi- proposed areas? can i pay tribute to all kinship care _ proposed areas? can i pay tribute to all kinship care is _ proposed areas? can i pay tribute to all kinship care is for _ proposed areas? can i pay tribute to all kinship care is for the _ all kinship care is for the incredible work they do and i would be very happy to review the plans he mentioned to make sure that ministers have a look at them too and i pay tribute to all of those in his constituency and elsewhere, they are doing a terrificjob and we are looking at ways we can support them further and will continue to do that. ~ . further and will continue to do that. ~ , ,, ., , ., that. the prime minister knows that in iztasingstoke _ that. the prime minister knows that in basingstoke we _ that. the prime minister knows that in basingstoke we also _ that. the prime minister knows that in basingstoke we also need - that. the prime minister knows that in basingstoke we also need a i that. the prime minister knows that in basingstoke we also need a new. in basingstoke we also need a new hospital and that's why he's given 900 million for our hospital trust to make that happen. does my right honourable friend agree that this is a once—in—a—lifetime investment and
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must modernise notjust the nhs health care provider but also support his plan to double medical training places by 2031? we are also ready to build a hospital a bit quicker if that helps. i ready to build a hospital a bit quicker if that helps.- ready to build a hospital a bit quicker if that helps. i am pleased that through _ quicker if that helps. i am pleased that through our _ quicker if that helps. i am pleased that through our new— quicker if that helps. i am pleased that through our new hospitals i that through our new hospitals programme hampshire hospital nhs foundation will receive significant investment to make sure the excellent care is available for her and all her constituents. the trust started a consultation last year and results are due at the end of march and will look forward to making sure we can deliver this project as quickly as possible, as part of the record capital investment in the nhs to deliver faster, better care to patients everywhere.— to deliver faster, better care to patients everywhere. happy new year, mr speaker- — patients everywhere. happy new year, mr speaker. reports _ patients everywhere. happy new year, mr speaker. reports suggest - patients everywhere. happy new year, mr speaker. reports suggest that i patients everywhere. happy new year, mr speaker. reports suggest that the l mr speaker. reports suggest that the prime minister's family investment company catamaran ventures is being wound up and that his wife is exiting her interest in her
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childcare company. so will the prime minister keep his promise to the liaison committee that includes a number of conservative mps and confirm whether or not he has forgotten to register any of his financial interests? and will he publish all details of catamaran ventures' investments? i publish all details of catamaran ventures' investments?- publish all details of catamaran ventures' investments? i take very seriously my _ ventures' investments? i take very seriously my responsibilities i ventures' investments? i take very seriously my responsibilities to i seriously my responsibilities to register and declare all of my relevant interests. all of them have been declared in accordance with the ministerial code and it's the role of the independent adviser to advise on what is necessary to publish in that list including in the case of ministers' family members and when specific things are asked, declarations are made on top of that which i've made and my wife has been an investor in british companies but thatis an investor in british companies but that is now something she has ceased to be further going forward. idea?
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to be further going forward. new ve larte to be further going forward. new very large shellfish _ to be further going forward. ije very large shellfish beds have been discovered in the thames estuary including razor clams and manila clams, highly priced around the world. so, will my right honourable friend join me in congratulating local fishermen friend join me in congratulating localfishermen on his proactive work and will he come to leigh—on—sea, meet my local fishermen so we can discuss how to maximise this brilliant brexit bonus for essex fishermen? flan maximise this brilliant brexit bonus for essex fishermen?— for essex fishermen? can i 'oin my heheuhehte — for essex fishermen? can i 'oin my honourable friends i for essex fishermen? can i 'oin my honourable friends in i for essex fishermen? can ijoin my honourable friends in welcoming i for essex fishermen? can i join my i honourable friends in welcoming this fantastic discovery. we've been capitalising on the benefits of brexit since we left the eu and we are making sure we can transform opportunity in the uk, particularly in fishing communities. the minister forfarming and fishing in fishing communities. the minister for farming and fishing will be happy to meet with her to discuss what more this could mean and i hope i also have an opportunity to come and see her and see this incredible discovery for myself too. i was
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and see her and see this incredible discovery for myself too.— discovery for myself too. i was a nurse in the _ discovery for myself too. i was a nurse in the nhs _ discovery for myself too. i was a nurse in the nhs for _ discovery for myself too. i was a nurse in the nhs for 25 - discovery for myself too. i was a nurse in the nhs for 25 years. it| discovery for myself too. i was a l nurse in the nhs for 25 years. it is an offence to my colleagues and our patients when the prime minister pretend he's got a grip on nhs waiting times. despite his big pledge to cut them, they've risen by half a million in the last year alone. he can blame striking all he likes but after 14 years of tories, who can possibly save the nhs is better off? flan who can possibly save the nhs is better off? ., who can possibly save the nhs is better off?— better off? can i thank thee honourable _ better off? can i thank thee honourable for— better off? can i thank thee honourable for her- better off? can i thank thee honourable for her decades | better off? can i thank thee l honourable for her decades of service in the nhs and commend all the work of our fantastic, hard—working nurses in the nhs and i'm pleased we've delivered early on a manifesto pledge to have 50,000 more nurses in the nhs, together with record numbers of doctors, elective surgical hubs, meaning all of which we are treating more people
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in the nhs can be done before. one thing that's hampering progress on the waiting list is obviously industrial action, so i hope the honourable canjoin with industrial action, so i hope the honourable can join with the 1 million nhs workers including nurses, midwives, therapists, paramedics, consultants and doctors, all of whom have reached a fair and reasonable pay settlement with the government and urge the junior doctors to do the same. we will return to the chamber for the expected statement from the post office minister who will give details, we hope, on what the prime minister announced at the beginning of prime minister's questions, that the government will introduce primary legislation to swiftly exonerate and compensate those who were wrongly prosecuted and convicted by the post office. let's introduce our guests, starting with the government minister, edward agar
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and the shadow paymaster general, jonathan ashworth and the deputy political editor vikki at younger. what does it mean? it's a big step, an act of parliament saying that hundreds of people will have their convictions overturned. it is pretty unprecedented and i don't think anyone can really remember a moment when it has happened and there is definitely concerning government about doing this because it's such a significant step. i think the view is that this is a very exceptional circumstance and has been going on a very long time and that is why this action is justified. very long time and that is why this action isjustified. i think it is worth saying there are dozens, hundreds of mps who have been campaigning on this for a long time. it's not true westminster did not know about this, and there was a public inquiry but it's all been too slow and it has left so many people with their lives ruined and it does just go to show that when the eyes of the country are focused on an issue how quickly the wheels of
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government can move. tote issue how quickly the wheels of government can move.- issue how quickly the wheels of government can move. we will discuss that later in — government can move. we will discuss that later in the _ government can move. we will discuss that later in the programme. _ government can move. we will discuss that later in the programme. swiftly i williams lost her husband suddenly at the age of 35 she was left alone with three children under the age of five, nothing could have prepared herfor that five, nothing could have prepared her for that grief and loss and she has done a remarkable job to carry on and stay afloat. it has been made much harder by the fact that bereavement payment support payments have been cut. with the prime minister becomes love to meet with dr laura and me to hear her first—hand experience of losing her husband and see what can be done for those like her? i am husband and see what can be done for those like her?— those like her? i am very sorry to hear about _ those like her? i am very sorry to hear about the _ those like her? i am very sorry to hear about the constituents i those like her? i am very sorry to hear about the constituents and l those like her? i am very sorry to i hear about the constituents and her tragic loss and will be happy to meet with her at the earliest opportunity. meet with her at the earliest opportunity-— meet with her at the earliest o-tortuni . ., . . ., . ., opportunity. congratulations to jackie opportunity. congratulations to jackie doyle — opportunity. congratulations to
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jackie doyle price. _ opportunity. congratulations to jackie doyle price. crossing i opportunity. congratulations to jackie doyle price. crossing the thames has — jackie doyle price. crossing the thames has occurred _ jackie doyle price. crossing the thames has occurred in - jackie doyle price. crossing the thames has occurred in my i thames has occurred in my constituency some starting at seven but the ferry service is due to be withdrawn. with so many people using that ferry service and the expansion of the thames freeport well at my honourable friend to all he can to encourage local authorities to make sure we take full advantage of the opportunities for a new contract for this service and perhaps to expand it? mt; this service and perhaps to expand it? g ., ., this service and perhaps to expand it? y .,., , this service and perhaps to expand it? y ., ., , ., it? my honourable friend is right to hitthliht it? my honourable friend is right to highlight that _ it? my honourable friend is right to highlight that the _ it? my honourable friend is right to highlight that the ferry _ it? my honourable friend is right to highlight that the ferry service i highlight that the ferry service performs an important part of the local transport services provided by local transport services provided by local authorities. those funding decisions are for the council is required but i would encourage them to consider the importance of cross river transport, as highlighted by my honourable friend in her local community and do that as part of the
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local upcoming transport plan. has the prime minister seen the utterly damning new unicef report showing a child income poverty rose way faster in the uk then anything other 39 countries analysed in the decades to 2021? scrapping the benefits cap, the two child limits, rolling out the two child limits, rolling out the scottish entitlement uk wide would do a huge amount. so why was he nor the so—called opposition commit to these policies? i he nor the so-called opposition commit to these policies? i would toint out commit to these policies? i would point out that _ commit to these policies? i would point out that since _ commit to these policies? i would point out that since 2010, - commit to these policies? i would point out that since 2010, the i point out that since 2010, the number of people living in poverty has reduced by 1.7 million, including hundreds of thousands of children are. but the best way to make sure that children don't grow up make sure that children don't grow up in poverty is to make sure their parents are in work and that they can keep as much of their hard earned money as possible, which is
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why i would urge the snp to think again about their plans to make scotland at the highest taxed part of the uk for the average worker. mt; of the uk for the average worker. iji constituents of the uk for the average worker. ii: constituents know of the uk for the average worker. ii constituents know only of the uk for the average worker. ii1: constituents know only too of the uk for the average worker. ii1 constituents know only too well of the uk for the average worker. ii: constituents know only too well the disaster of living under a labour regime. just before christmas, the labour council and bradford announced they were bankrupt and then spent the first three hours of then spent the first three hours of the subsequent council meeting debating gaza and israel rather than the perilous financial situation they were in. mother prime minister support my campaign to get our constituents out of bradford council control, which is more urgent than ever, and will make sure that the government deliver a swimming pool in bingley, which is something that was run down and then closed down as part of the mismanagement of bradford council. he
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part of the mismanagement of bradford council.— part of the mismanagement of bradford council. he makes an excellent point. _ bradford council. he makes an excellent point. whether - bradford council. he makes an excellent point. whether it's . bradford council. he makes an i excellent point. whether it's local excellent point. whether its local councils in case area or nottingham or birmingham, we see a track record of labour mismanagement of finances and local government and when that happens and with labour in power, it is working people who pay the price which is why you have to stick to our plan. which is why you have to stick to our lan. ,, , ., ' which is why you have to stick to our plan-_ we - which is why you have to stick to our plan._ we are i our plan. question 14. we are providing _ our plan. question 14. we are providing extensive _ our plan. question 14. we are providing extensive financial i providing extensive financial support was few £100 billion between 2022 and 2025 to help everyone with energy bills. last 2022 and 2025 to help everyone with ener: bills. . , ., a, energy bills. last month, marie curie told me _ energy bills. last month, marie curie told me that _ energy bills. last month, marie curie told me that terminally i energy bills. last month, marie curie told me that terminally illi curie told me that terminally ill people who want to die at home have been forced into hospitals to die
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because they can't afford to heat their homes sufficiently. were the prime minister meet with me, marie curie and other organisations, including energy companies, who are fully supportive of a social energy tariff, and try and find a way forward? i tariff, and try and find a way forward?— tariff, and try and find a way forward? . ,, , forward? i will make sure the honourable _ forward? i will make sure the honourable lady _ forward? i will make sure the honourable lady gets - forward? i will make sure the honourable lady gets the - forward? i will make sure the - honourable lady gets the meeting that she needs with the appropriate minister but we are working very closely with 0fgem to make sure the most vulnerable households are protected, especially as this winter, and is developing at a register of vulnerable households, that they can sign up to it for free to receive extra help. but the relevant minister will meet with marie curie and the honourable lady. while prioritising connecting towns in the north, i have a suggestion.
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are direct trains between preston and liverpool don't exist because you have to get off because of buffers at 0rmskirk. science and technology is going to allow that to be an accessible possibility and then get the station event in leyland. does not agree with me that's a great idea that we should crack on with?— that's a great idea that we should crack on with? network north will significantly _ crack on with? network north will significantly improve _ crack on with? network north will significantly improve connectivityl significantly improve connectivity across the north, including a £3 billion to connect up all the major towns and cities of the north and £12 billion to improve connectivity between manchester and liverpool. my honourable friend is a fantastic champion for the region and to know both her and the honourable member for southport south discussed that station with the transport secretary recently but we are keen on use every penny that will be saved on our decision on hs2 to reinvest back in the north and her idea sounds
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fantastic. , �* , ., , fantastic. every parent's worst nightmare _ fantastic. every parent's worst nightmare is _ fantastic. every parent's worst nightmare is watching - fantastic. every parent's worst nightmare is watching her - fantastic. every parent's worst - nightmare is watching her children starve and suffer. yet, in gaza, living hell is being realised with innocent children eating weeds and 1000 children having lost one or more legs, many of which have to have them amputated without anaesthesia or pain relief. i'm sure the prime minister will agree this is inhumane, so well he plays probably call for access for food and medicine it to reach gaza and tell israel to stop attacking health care facilities? figs tell israel to stop attacking health care facilities?— care facilities? as i've said previously. _ care facilities? as i've said previously, we're - care facilities? as i've said previously, we're deeply i care facilities? as i've said - previously, we're deeply concerned about the impact of the fighting in gaza and the civilian population, particularly children and. too many have lost lives already and there is a desperate need for an increase in
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humanitarian support to gaza. i have expressed those points repeatedly to prime minister netanyahu and we are doing what we can to get more user in. with earlier this month said the first maritime shipment of aid into egypt which will help and we are working with the united nations to deliver a new humanitarian land corridor from deliver a new humanitarian land corridorfrom georgian into gaza because i agree, we want to see more aid into gaza and we should be proud that the united kingdom is playing a leading role in making that happen. there we go, but as prime minister's questions. the breaking news is on the post office scandal. it's been introduced that —— the government will introduce a new law that ensures people have been convicted will be swiftly exonerated. happening in the commons now, there is going to be an urgent question on this issue. we will monitor what is
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sighed and bring some lines from that, but we want to get you some reaction to that news that rishi sunak has said there will be brought forward a new law. he said the scandal was one of the greatest miscarriages ofjustice in this country's history, and he said that victims must getjustice and the compensation they deserve. one of those victims was chris head, one of the people wrongly accused of theft and fraud. i can bring him in. chris head, thank you very much for joining us. can i first forget your reaction to the news that the prime minister has announced during prime minister's questions that they will bring in a new law? it is minister's questions that they will bring in a new law?— bring in a new law? it is fabulous news for those _ bring in a new law? it is fabulous news for those people. _ bring in a new law? it is fabulous news for those people. we - bring in a new law? it is fabulous i news for those people. we couldn't continue the process is that we are using, because thejustice continue the process is that we are using, because the justice system which is not able to cope with the vast number of people that we are
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talking 900 convictions. we would looking at maybe ten or 15 years to get them overturned, and it's likely they would not be allowed to see that happen. the fact they are bringing in the emergency legislation in order to deliver that, that helps unlock their compensation as well. it is welcome news. , ., , ., news. news on the compensation, there will be _ news. news on the compensation, there will be an _ news. news on the compensation, there will be an upfront _ news. news on the compensation, there will be an upfront payment l news. news on the compensation, | there will be an upfront payment of £75,000 for a vital group of postmasters that took the action. i am in that group, and the problem here, we have a small amount given after the court case in 2019, where top up in 2022, so it in dribs and drabs. one of the —— i am one of the claimants of the full claim into that scheme, they are still litigating every part of the claim. we need a commitment that they will
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deliver on their promise to restore back to the position they would have been in. not this half—hearted approach, a little bit here, a little bit there. we need some kind of commitment. we are 1 million miles apart still, so we need to see a lot more on that to see where it takes us. , ., . ,, ., takes us. lets go back to the commons. — takes us. lets go back to the commons, because - takes us. lets go back to the commons, because the - takes us. lets go back to the commons, because the post| takes us. lets go back to the - commons, because the post office minister as talking in the commons at the moment. key constraint on how quickly we can settle them. the upfront offer is smaller for one settle them. the upfront offer is smallerfor one it settle them. the upfront offer is smaller for one it scheme than the overturned convictions because the claims tend to be smaller. we expect that a third of go claimants will want to consider this route. when i made my statement on monday i was looking forjustice for postmasters. the whole house is united on this and i believe that in the light of
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last week's excellent itv series, i think the whole nation is united on it too. we have all been moved by the claims of sosa postmasters who had been unfairly convicted with damage to their health and relationships and finances. were seen whole lives ruined by this brutal and arbitrary exercise of power. hundreds of convictions remain extant. some of those convictions will have relied on the evidence of the discredited horizon system. others will have been the result of an appalling failure is of the post office investigation and prosecution functions. the evidence, which is already emerging from the inquiry, has shown not only incompetence but malevolence in many of their actions. this was evidence which was not available to the courts when they made their
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decisions on individual cases. so far, 95 of over 190 convictions have been overturned. we know postmasters have been reluctant to apply to have convictions overturned, many of them have decided that they have been through enough and cannot face further engagement with authority. many fear having their hopes raised only to be dashed yet again. the horizon compensation advisory board has recommended that we should overturn all of the convictions of the postmasters who were prosecuted in the horizon scandal. i think their motivation for doing so is absolutely right and we will work with them to speed up the process. can i put on my record my thanks to the lord who is in the gallery and the lord who is in the gallery and the right honourable member of the north durham for the work and his campaign generally and on the advisory board. following the recommendation will involve quite
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unprecedented action by parliament to overturn specific verdicts of the courts. the government, of course, completely recognises the important of an independent court system and judiciary. this recommendation raises important issues of constitutional principle. this is therefore not a decision that we can take lightly. it is also creating the risk of a different sort of injustice. i'm sure that great many people would wrongly convicted in a scandal but i cannot tell the house that all of those prosecuted were indeedin that all of those prosecuted were indeed in the sun or indeed that it was 90% or 80% or 70% without retrying every case we cannot know. so the risk is that instead of unjust convictions, we shall end up with unjust acquittals and we do not know how many. the only way we can tell is a resolving cases through the courts, further dragging out the distress to many innocent people.
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can ijust distress to many innocent people. can i just say, distress to many innocent people. can ijust say, this is a very important _ can ijust say, this is a very important issue and i will allow the minister— important issue and i will allow the minister of— important issue and i will allow the minister of to continue. i will say to the _ minister of to continue. i will say to the opposition that your time will increase to see david as well. it is will increase to see david as well. it is an_ will increase to see david as well. it is an important issue to curtail. it is an important issue to curtail. iwill_ it is an important issue to curtail. twill sav— it is an important issue to curtail. twill say to— it is an important issue to curtail. i will say to officials that when people — i will say to officials that when people provide speeches it is for three _ people provide speeches it is for three minutes, iwant people provide speeches it is for three minutes, i want you to fulfil this because the issue is far, far too important. thank you, mr speaker. i apologise for the length of the statement but it is as you say a of vital importance. we were faced with a dilemma, eitheraccept the importance. we were faced with a dilemma, either accept the present problem of many people carrying the unjustified slur of conviction or accept that an unknown number of people were genuinely... will be ends tolerated and compensated. i can therefore announce that we intend to bring forward legislation as soon as we can to overturn the convictions of all of those
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convicted in england or wales, of available evidence given during the horizon scandal. the government will continue in the coming days whether to include the small number of cases that have already been considered by the appeal court and the convictions that have been held. we recognise that have been held. we recognise that this is an exceptional step but these are exceptional circumstances. as the house knows, people with convictions which have been overturned are offered a choice between having their compensation individually assessed or settling on an upfront offer of £600,000. so as far as possible, we want to avoid guilty people walking away with hundreds of thousands of pounds of public money. but we cannot make the provision of compensation subject to a detailed examination of guilt. we have concluded that to do so would be unfair to individuals to ask the court to do that again. and we cannot turn this into an
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administrative exercise. so all we ask is that as part of their claims and compensation, postmasters sign a statement to the effect that they did not commit the crimes of which they were accused and they —— anyone found to have signed such a statement and truthfully will be putting themselves at risk for prosecution of fraud. i do not present to the house that this is a foolproof device but it is a proportional ball which respects the ordeal with which these people have already suffered. it means that an honest postmaster will have his or her conviction overturn and just by signing one document can secure compensation. no one should take this as a coach delete my criticism of the judiciary, their original decisions were taken in good faith of the understanding that prosecutions were properly
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conducted. and that the findings of the horizon system were true. these are the circumstances and we need to act quickly and decisively. time is one thing that we and the convicted postmasters do not have. our arrangement will apply to all of those convicted in england and wales based on post office investigations, including those convicted by other products that relied on the other investigations, the fruit of a poison tree. we have plenty more work to do on this solution. we need to prepare legislation and i want to discuss that solution with the advisory board. by meeting them later this afternoon. some prosecutions have been undertaken in scotland and northern ireland where justice is devolved. we are of course engaging the scotland and northern irish administrations in respect of wrongful convictions and their administrations. we will do these things as quickly as we can keep the house informed. the house
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will have heard that we are well aware the imperfections of the solution. i am sure that this will attract some critics but when they criticise the court, i invite them to say what they would do otherwise. would they leave many people suffering under the burden of unjust convictions for many years or perhaps for ever with no access to compensation? orwould perhaps for ever with no access to compensation? or would they create some administrative process to deciding innocence. sol some administrative process to deciding innocence. so i very much hope the whole house will stand with the government to deliver rapid justice to convicted postmasters who have been waiting much, much, too long. can ijust long. can i just say, long. can ijust say, i will extend the time _ can ijust say, i will extend the time i— can ijust say, i will extend the time. i think it was so important to -et time. i think it was so important to get all_ time. i think it was so important to get all of— time. i think it was so important to get all of this on the record. i do believe — get all of this on the record. i do believe you _ get all of this on the record. i do believe you did want to make a statement but you were overall. at least _ statement but you were overall. at least we _ statement but you were overall. at least we have certainly got the statement now. david davis.-
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statement now. david davis. �* , ~ , statement now. david davis. a ~ , david davis. as the minister said, earlier this _ david davis. as the minister said, earlier this week _ david davis. as the minister said, earlier this week many _ david davis. as the minister said, earlier this week many of - david davis. as the minister said, earlier this week many of us - david davis. as the minister said, l earlier this week many of us across the chamber called for this appalling injustice to be sold in months not years and it looks like the government has listened to that call and will serve justice to those. undoubtably there are typical constitutional and legal issues involved, as he laid out in detail. some of the victims i've spoken to said that they need individual exoneration rather than a grand pardon because they are understandably concerned about being bracketed with the very small number of people who are actually not innocent. what —— will the minister gave us an update as he continues to look into this matter to address the concerns? i also welcome further elaboration on the issue of compensation. fujitsu are still at the heart of government it systems. can the minister tell the house whether fujitsu will degree required to meet some of the cost of the
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enormously expensive compensation package. and finally, will the government accelerates the investigations to convicted those who are really guilty of causing the scandal by perverting the course of justice? scandal by perverting the course of 'ustice? ., ~' , ., ~ scandal by perverting the course of 'ustice? . ,, ~ .~ . justice? thank you, mr speaker. can i think m justice? thank you, mr speaker. can i think my right _ justice? thank you, mr speaker. can i think my right honourable - justice? thank you, mr speaker. can i think my right honourable friend i i think my right honourable friend for his urgent question. and for his collaboration with us on these matters. of course, we look very carefully at the issue of individual exoneration. we didn't see any way possible to do that without an exhaustive and time—consuming administrative process which would drag further burdens to the burdens that people have already suffered during this process. the other issue is getting people to come forward, again, this has been one of the major issues in getting people to appeal their convictions. we saw this very much as the lesser of two evils in terms of the solution we
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have adopted. nevertheless, we are very keen to discuss mitigations and safeguards with other members of the house. i set out one in my remarks earlier on, one of the requirements of the styling statement —— signing a statement of innocence. i look forward to working with him on mechanisms to make sure that the people who do get access to compensation are innocent of the charges. he raises a point about fujitsu, an important point there has been raised many times. as he knows, part of what the government did to put in place a statutory inquiry which is due to complete by the end of the year. hopefully report soon after. at that point in time we will be able to assess more clearly who is actually responsible. i know many people may already hold
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a view on that already. we think it is right that we follow a process for identifying individuals or organisations who are responsible for the scandal. of course, those organisations, we would expect them to financially contribute. so there are financial and legal measures that we can take. with regards to individuals, of course, a it may well be enough to take forward prosecutions and i think those in that is the post office minister giving us an update on those that will be exonerated in the post office scandal. i want to go back to chris head, in particular the news that you will have to sign a statement to say that you did not commit the crime. it is
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statement to say that you did not commit the crime.— commit the crime. it is so complicated. _ commit the crime. it is so complicated. it _ commit the crime. it is so complicated. it is - commit the crime. it is soj complicated. it is dragged commit the crime. it is so - complicated. it is dragged over so many years, and a lot of the evidence in the individual cases doesn't exist now, because they destroyed things after seven years. i understand from david davis what he said in terms of a group of people not wanting to be classed and brought into the same bracket as others, in case there was a bad apple in that group, but i don't see how else, unless they can set out the mixtures, how they can put them individually through the court. i don't see how we're going to deal with this in a matter of months or even a year, rather than ten or 15 years. i don't see any other alternative here.— years. i don't see any other alternative here. �* , ., u, alternative here. and you welcome the news today? _ alternative here. and you welcome the news today? absolutely. - alternative here. and you welcome the news today? absolutely. like i alternative here. and you welcome i the news today? absolutely. like sa, ou can't the news today? absolutely. like sa, you can't have — the news today? absolutely. like sa, you can't have potentially _ the news today? absolutely. like sa, you can't have potentially 700, - the news today? absolutely. like sa, you can't have potentially 700, 800, | you can't have potentially 700, 800, 900 people who are innocent, because there are maybe a tiny number in the group who may have done something wrong, who will never see justice.
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see their names cleared, and never access the compensation you deserve. ~ . ., . . deserve. one week ago, the itv drama was about to — deserve. one week ago, the itv drama was about to air, _ deserve. one week ago, the itv drama was about to air, and _ deserve. one week ago, the itv drama was about to air, and now _ deserve. one week ago, the itv drama was about to air, and now a _ deserve. one week ago, the itv drama was about to air, and now a week- was about to air, and now a week later we have this. can you quite believe it, after all the years you have been campaigning? absolutely not. we expected _ have been campaigning? absolutely not. we expected quite _ have been campaigning? absolutely not. we expected quite an - have been campaigning? absolutely not. we expected quite an uplift - not. we expected quite an uplift from the drama, the drama is fantastic, and it was really true about the suffering, and that is what the general public has got behind, but i could never believe this is where we got to. it is really set the fire in the house, and it has made the mp5 act. but why is it taking this for that to happen? why does it have to be outrage from the public that the government had no option but to act? this story has been out there for 20 years, and that the last year since the high court case, we could have had this dealt with well before now. and there are still questions about how the post office handled it, and
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are still handling it? post how the post office handled it, and are still handling it?— are still handling it? post office are still handling it? post office are still handling it? post office are still in _ are still handling it? post office are still in charge _ are still handling it? post office are still in charge of _ are still handling it? post office are still in charge of the - are still in charge of the compensation scheme for the people who have had their convictions overturned, so the fact that post office are still controlling that particular part and we are still halfway through the inquiry, i think a lot needs to be done. they should have grabbed this while they had the chance, taking everything out of post office's hands, put it with an independent body, share that with thejudge, because this hasjust been dragging on forfar too long. are you hopeful this could be sorted quite quickly? i are you hopeful this could be sorted quite quickly?— quite quickly? i hope so. i hoping that further— quite quickly? i hope so. i hoping that further announcements - quite quickly? i hope so. i hoping that further announcements willl quite quickly? i hope so. i hoping - that further announcements will come this week, and they can pull up this emergency legislation in place within weeks or a small number of months. and this can be tied up by the end of this year, hopefully at the end of this year, hopefully at the latest. , . .,
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the end of this year, hopefully at the latest. , . . ., the latest. chris head, a former postmaster. _ the latest. chris head, a former postmaster, thank _ the latest. chris head, a former postmaster, thank you - the latest. chris head, a former postmaster, thank you very - the latest. chris head, a former. postmaster, thank you very much the latest. chris head, a former- postmaster, thank you very much for joining us here on busy news. if you arejustjoining us, the breaking news is that the prime minister has announced that the government will introduce a new law to ensure that those who were wrongly convicted over the post office scandal are swiftly exonerated and compensated. rishi sunak said that the scandal was one of the greatest miscarriages ofjustice in this country's history. he said that the victims must get justice history. he said that the victims must getjustice and the compensation they deserve. you can get more on the bbc news website and appi get more on the bbc news website and app, which is running a special live page. now, here on bbc news, it is time for the one o'clock news. of the post office scandal are "swiftly exonerated". the government has been under huge pressure to act, after a new public focus on the victims whose lives were turned upside down by a faulty computer system. we will make sure that the truth comes to light, we right the wrongs of the past and the victims get
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the justice they deserve. some of the victims told us this morning of their ordeal — hundres were prosecuted for fraud and false accounting. it wrecked my life, my family's life, and everybody i know's life. it was the most horrendous thing i have ever been through. after what he calls one of the greatest miscarriages ofjustice in this country's history rishi sunak announces a new law to clear the names of all the affected sub postmasters. also on the programme this lunchtime. why parents need to have "uncomfortable conversations" with their children about the dangers of taking nude pictures on their phones. and the high cost of feeding your baby formula milk — and what one company is doing about it. and coming up on bbc news. for the first time, fulham will play in the semi—final
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of the league cup. if liverpool win the trophy, it would be for a record tenth time.

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